Noise Output

To determine whether any particular dehumidifier should be considered to be “quiet” or “loud” we performed four different noise output tests. The first test involved placing our sound level meter right above the unit’s control panel on high fan speed. For the second test we again placed the sound meter above the control panel, but this time set the dehumidifier to low fan speed.

For the third and fourth test we placed the sound meter 10 feet away from the dehumidifier to record noise output levels. For the third test the dehumidifier was set to the high fan speed setting and for the fourth test the unit was again set to the low fan speed setting at the same distance.

The first two tests allowed us to determine the unit’s noise output at close range while the second two tests allowed us to make the same determination at a range we felt was more indicative of a real world environment. In fact, our recommendation is that you focus on each unit’s performance in our 10 foot test much more than you do on our close range testing (we do the same in our product reviews).

Before we show you the results of our testing we need to discuss the sizable advantage certain units had in each noise output test we performed. All dehumidifiers come equipped with an intake fan on the front of the unit and an exhaust fan on the top or side of the unit. These fans, in addition to any compressor noise, are the primary culprits in producing noise as a dehumidifier operates. While all dehumidifiers have their intake fan on the front of the dehumidifier, the location of the exhaust fan varies.

Those units that exhausted out of the top of the dehumidifier had a distinct disadvantage compared to those units that exhausted out of the side. This is especially true for the tests that were carried out at the dehumidifier’s control panel. The noise produced by the side exhaust units was directed to the side of the unit, away from the sound meter’s location. The noise produced by the top exhaust units was directed above the dehumidifier, much closer to the sound meter’s location. While this disadvantage was more pronounced during the control panel tests, it was still present during long range testing. Again, side exhaust units had their exhaust fans producing noise directed away from the sound meter. Top exhaust units also had their exhaust fans producing noise directed away from the sound meter but to a lesser extent. Thus, they were still at a disadvantage.

Keep this information in mind as you study the comparison charts below.

You can sort the table below by clicking on the up/down arrows next to each column heading. Clicking on the down arrow next to “far high fan”, for example, will sort the dehumidifiers we tested from most quiet to least quiet in the noise output test where we placed the sound meter 10 ft away from the dehumidifier while it was on high fan speed. Clicking on the up arrow will reverse the list sorting the same units from least quiet to most quiet.

70 Pint Dehumidifier Noise Output

Manufacturer and Model
CP High Fan
CP Low Fan
10 ft High Fan
10 ft Low Fan
Frigidaire FFAD7033R161.257.252.948.8
Keystone KSTAD70B58.255.949.948.1
Danby DDR70A2GP73.671.554.850.8
Honeywell DH70W71.966.553.350.1
RCA RDH70558.855.949.747.8
GE ADEL70LR71.568.555.652.8
Haier DE65EM71.067.854.252.9
Kenmore KM7059.35751.449.9
Whirlpool AD70GUSB61.958.453.651.1
Hisense DH-70KP1SLE67.564.152.149.7
Friedrich D70BP73.167.755.451.1
SPT SD-72PE59.657.4
50.448.2
Haier HM70EP73.670.656.653.3
Delonghi DD70PE72.166.254.851.7

50 Pint Dehumidifier Noise Output

Manufacturer and Model
CP High Fan
CP Low Fan
10 ft High Fan
10 ft Low Fan
Frigidaire FFAD5033R161.9
55.653.647.2
Keystone KSTAD50B60.257.451.948.8
Friedrich D50BP68.761.851.147.3
Delonghi DD50PE68.763.353.651.4
SPT SD-52PE 58.255.451.748.6

30 Pint Dehumidifier Noise Output

Manufacturer and Model
CP High Fan
CP Low Fan
10 ft High Fan
10 ft Low Fan
Frigidaire FFAD3033R162.155.453.346.1
Hisense DH-35K1SJE575.171.558.255.9
GE ADEL30LR73.367.154.849.7
Haier DM32M-L73.170.956.153.3

Important Notes

#1 All readings are in decibels. “50.2″ = a sound meter reading of 50.2 dB

#2 “CP” = control panel = sound meter reading right above the dehumidifier’s control panel

#3 “10 ft” = sound meter reading 10 ft from the dehumidifier’s location.

#4 Lower readings are better. For example, a dehumidifier producing 50 dB of noise is quieter than a dehumidifier producing 60 dB of noise.

#5 Side exhaust units are the Frigidaire 70 pint unit, the Keystone 70 pint unit, the RCA 70 pint unit, the Whirlpool 70 pint unit, the Kenmore 70 pint unit, the SPT 50 and 70 pint units, and the Hisense 30 pint unit. As we discuss above, these units had a distinct advantage in all noise output tests.

Comments

  1. Duncan Tsang says

    I am confused, without a Rating Scale, all 12 Legend can be very subjective. Can you send me the Rating Scale to look into ?

    E.g. Noise Output of Danby ddr70a2gp is rated 3; but Haier-HM70EP is 2, the readings have small differences (I understand), but in the absent of the Scale, it just not very helpful.

    70 Pint Dehumidifier Noise Output
    Model NO Rating CP High Fan CP Low Fan 10 ft High Fan 10 ft Low Fan
    DDR70A2GP 3 73.6 71.5 54.8 50.8
    HM70EP 2 73.6 70.6 56.6 53.3

    • Admin says

      The rating rubric we use to give the dehumidifier a score out of 5 in each review category, including noise output, can be found about halfway down this page.

Have a question or comment? Let us know below.

Your email address will not be published.